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Books for those in ministry organizations who desire to take their leadership, teams, governance, and ministry effectiveness to the next level.

23 Jul '13

Keeping our eyes open and not ignoring ministry threats

Posted by T.J. Addington in ministry threats

One of my hero's Winston Churchill once wrote, "Our difficulties and our dangers will not be removed by closing our eyes to them."

How true that is. And how often we try to close our eyes to them and not deal with them with the realism that we should - and they don't go away.

I spoke recently to a senior pastor who has a staff member that is causing all kinds of mayhem in the church because of poor EQ (Emotional Intelligence). They have actually lost several families. When I asked him what he was learning in leadership these days he said, "Not to avoid the issues that I know are there." He admitted that he didn't like dealing with tough issues but said he and his board had been negligent in not dealing with this staff member.

We usually know in our heart of hearts - our gut - what the difficulties and dangers are. It can be a staff member who is undermining ministry. It could be a staff member whose poor EQ is hurting people in the church but leaders won't deal with it. It could be a ministry strategy that we know isn't working but we don't want to face the reality and pull the plug. It is often a board that is divided and cannot get its act together but no one wants to tackle the elephant in the room! It could be a rogue board member who is talking out of school or politicking outside the board room.

In Winston's day, especially prior to the Second World War, there were many in the British government who closed their eyes to what was really happening in Europe and to Hitler's true intentions. Winston did not and it was his clarion call to action that finally galvanized the British nation to stand up to the problem the world faced.

Are you bold enough to name and stand up to the difficulties or dangers in your ministry context? The truth is they won't go away and the longer they are left unattended, the more costly the pay day is.